Merry Krampus, LA

As of Tuesday, December 6, 2016

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St. Nicholas

Willkommen!

The Bavarian Alpine folklore legend of Krampus was alive and well in Los Angeles’ Highland Park neighborhood at the recent Krampus Ball LA.

The story of Krampus dates back to 17th-century Austria. Krampus was a horned figure—half goat and half demon. Unlike St. Nicholas who gave gifts to good children at Christmas, Krampus punished children who had misbehaved.

The recent Krampus Ball LA was held on Dec. 2 at the Old World ballroom of Highland Park’s Ebell Club. St. Nicholas emceed the event where guests were encouraged to dress the theme of the ball. Several dressed as Krampus, others wore traditional Alpine clothing and some came as misbehaving children. Depending on who you asked, the scene was either in an old world Austrian Alpine village, a late ‘70s/early ‘80s goth-punk-new wave club—or 1782 nightmare filled with horned demons.

The evening was filled with a wide range of Bavarian-themed entertainment. There were vendors selling art and jewelry. The G.T.E.V. D’Oberlandler dance troop performed traditional Bavarian folk dances. Hammerstein Musik Bavaria was a lively four-piece band. The lead singer, dressed in traditional lederhosen, was an exciting entertainer performing high-knee, energetic dance moves and finishing off the set with a version of “I’m too sexy for my Lederhosen”—with yodeling. Other entertainers included a marionette song-and-dance group and a group with an operatic-inspired main singer.

It was an interesting evening filled with music, dance and fashion with Bavarian and demonic roots!

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HORNS N’ FUR: 18th-century chic could never go wrong when you combine fur and horns to make a total look. It’s an attention grabber!

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EVIL GLAM: Almost late ‘70s early ‘80s punk/goth feel with twist of men’s dandies and ladies costume-chic!

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WHAT EVIL LURKS: Krampus, evil shop keepers and demons roam around the ball. Even a glamorized gold hip-hop-inspired Krampus seemed fresh!

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ALPINE: Lederhosen, graphic and patterned sweaters, novelty vests and traditional woman’s coats and dresses.