IMPORT & EXPORT

Port Congestion Worsens With Mounting Fees for Importers

By Deborah Belgum | November 13, 2014

Apparel importer Ashok Kumar is patiently waiting in Los Angeles for six to eight containers of sweaters and jackets to arrive by boat from Asia to stock his various clothing stores in downtown Los Angeles.

Port Congestion Fees Suspended for Shippers But More Problems at the Docks

The silver lining in the West Coast port-congestion problem is this: There will be tons of discounted winter merchandise for sale after the holiday shopping season.

Work Stoppage Spreads to Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach

Adding to the cargo congestion at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, longshore workers allegedly started imposing a work slowdown at the largest port complex in the United States.

AAFA Joins Forces with Chinese Textile and Apparel Group

The American Apparel & Footwear Association and the China Chamber of Commerce for Import and Export of Textiles and Apparel have signed a memorandum of understanding to better understand what is happening in the apparel and textile industries in China.

Apparel Importers Hope to See Solutions to Local Port Congestion Problems

Apparel Importers Hope to See Solutions to Local Port Congestion Problems

For nearly two weeks now, Ram Kundani has been waiting to receive seven cargo containers filled with tops, sweaters and dresses shipped from Bangladesh, China and Indonesia to the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

Adding to Cargo Congestion Problem

Adding to Cargo Congestion Problem

A fire that engulfed an old wooden wharf nearly the length of three football fields at the Port of Los Angeles was completely contained by early morning on Sept. 24, port officials said.

Customs Officials Ease Back on Changes for First-Sale Rule

Customs officials have stopped pushing for major adjustments to the so-called “First-Sale Rule,” which would have required handing over a boatload of documents to validate where goods were made and at what price.

How Mounting Congestion at Local Ports Is Affecting Apparel Importers

How Mounting Congestion at Local Ports Is Affecting Apparel Importers

Bob Wysocki of Sears Holdings complained that sometimes it takes as long as one to two weeks to extract his merchandise out of the port complex in Los Angeles and get Sears’ cargo containers on a train, where it might take another two weeks to reach a warehouse.

West Coast Dockworkers and Port Employers Make Progress in Negotiations

The long and drawn-out contract negotiations between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association took a giant step forward.

Africa Could Be the Next Frontier With AGOA

China may be the apparel factory to the world, but one day Africa could be right up there with the powerhouse manufacturer.

Vietnam’s Apparel Industry is on a Rapid-Expansion Plan

Vietnam’s Apparel Industry is on a Rapid-Expansion Plan

China and Vietnam are still the top two providers of apparel and textiles to the United States, but Vietnam is growing quickly as an apparel powerhouse.

Apparel and Footwear Importers Concerned About Changes in First-Sale Rule

Apparel and Footwear Importers Concerned About Changes in First-Sale Rule

U.S. apparel and textile importers are rallying to push back a new proposal that would require more stringent record-keeping requirements to bring in goods under the so-called “First-Sale Rule,” which went into effect more than 25 years ago.

Cargo container Volumes Rise at U.S. Ports as Contract Talks Continue on the Waterfront

As contract talks between West Coast longshore workers and their employers continued into their 14th week, importers were playing it cautious and bringing in as much merchandise as they could to fill holiday orders.

Cargo-Container Volumes Surge at Local Ports

With contract negotiations still going on with West Coast longshore workers, apparel importers and retailers were pushing to land their goods before a potential work stoppage or port strike takes place.

Longshore Workers Get Ready to Return to the Negotiating Table

After taking a three-day break, longshore workers and their employers were planning to get back at the negotiating table to hammer out a new six-year contract that expired on July 1.

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