IMPORT & EXPORT

Port Congestion Worsens With Mounting Fees for Importers

By Deborah Belgum | November 13, 2014

Apparel importer Ashok Kumar is patiently waiting in Los Angeles for six to eight containers of sweaters and jackets to arrive by boat from Asia to stock his various clothing stores in downtown Los Angeles.

Delays Mount in Retrieving Cargo at Port of LA

Delays Mount in Retrieving Cargo at Port of LA

Truck drivers are waiting as long as five to six hours to pick up cargo at some terminals at the Port of Los Angeles.

Fast Means Cash for Central American Clothing Makers

Fast Means Cash for Central American Clothing Makers

Quick turn has always been one advantage for Gua­temala and the other Central American countries that make up the Dominican Republic–Central American Free Trade Agreement. But it is becoming more important than ever.

Customs Scrutiny to Increase With Hundreds of New Employees

For years, U.S. customs officials have been playing a game of cat and mouse with apparel importers, trying to figure out who is undervaluing their goods to get out of paying higher duties.

Southern California Man Sentenced for Importing Counterfeit Goods

Kevin Wang, a 54-year-old resident of Rosemead, Calif., was sentenced on May 8 to 31 months in federal prison for bringing in 11 containers filled with counterfeit apparel and other goods from China.

Contract Negotiations on the Waterfront Worry Many About Shipping Season

Contract Negotiations on the Waterfront Worry Many About Shipping Season

Ship early and ship often. That’s the advice logistics experts are giving to apparel and textile importers who don’t want to be caught up in a possible strike that could take place this summer at West Coast ports.

Hudson Jeans Shifting Production from U.S. to Mexico

The Los Angeles premium-jeans maker was recently acquired for $98 million by Joe’s Jeans, another LA-based denim-pant maker.

Apparel Imports Slow from China and Grow from Vietnam

As wages rise for apparel factory workers in China, less and less clothing is being imported from that country into the United States.

EU Drops Extra Tariff on U.S. Women’s Jeans

Nearly one year after slapping an additional 26 percent tariff on U.S.-made women’s jeans, the European Union has decided to reduce that tariff to 0.35 percent starting on May 1.

EU Drops Extra Tariff on U.S. Women’s Jeans

Nearly one year after slapping an additional 26 percent tariff on U.S.-made women’s jeans, the European Union has decided to reduce that tariff to 0.35 percent starting on May 1.

Industry Voices: How to Use Free-Trade Zones to Save When Importing Apparel

Foreign-trade zones offer great opportunities for lowering the overall cost of imported apparel and other products. While more and more companies are taking advantage of these opportunities, a clear understanding of FTZ rules and regulations is critical to ensuring maximum savings and avoiding problems.

Container Traffic to Rise 12.4 Percent This Month

As spring-like weather entices consumers out of their shells to shop, the number of cargo containers being shipped across the ocean to the nation’s ports is expected to increase by as much as 12.4 percent in March.

Will Europe Keep Its High Tariff on U.S. Women’s Jeans?

The steep 38 percent tariff the European Union slapped on U.S.-made women’s jeans last year is set to expire on April 30, but no one is sure whether the tariff will disappear or be extended for another year.

Container Shipping Prices to Remain Low Until 2016

One nugget of good news for apparel and textile importers is that shipping rates along the Asia–to–Los Angeles route should remain at bargain-basement prices for the next few years.

William Rast Label Headed to Europe for Big Expansion

The Los Angeles–centric William Rast label hit Canada last year and was in all of the Hudson’s Bay department stores, now it is headed to Europe, where it will be in stores in Germany, Switzerland, England and Italy.

U.S. Apparel Makers Forgo Free-Trade Production

The United States has free-trade agreements with 20 countries around the world, but only 14 percent of the apparel imported into the United States actually takes advantage of them.